Essential Listening

 
 
 
TONE: The tone that a musician achieves is probably the most elusive and abstract part of playing an instrument, yet it is also one of the most important qualities. (Who wants to sit through a performance if it’s not pleasant to listen to?) How do we develop a good tone?? Feedback and good examples are of prime importance. One of the best ways to achieve this goal is to work with a private teacher who can play with and for the student. A second way is to listen to lots of performances and recordings.
 
So, when you are looking for good gift ideas, consider a recording! Below is a list that has been compiled.  It is obviously not an exhaustive list, but it should help you get started. I have chosen music that you should enjoy listening to; however, you may not be used to listening to this type of music, so I encourage you to listen to the album/artist/piece several times with an open mind before judging.
 
The easiest way to purchase recordings is through iTunes. Other distributors include Barnes and Noble, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.walkingfrogrecords.com , or as we do with everything else…just Google it…(ex. “Flute CDs” or “Flute recordings”).
 
BAND: Good band recordings are sometimes hard to find, but they often include solo baritone horn (euphonium) work, which is even harder to find! British Bandsman Centenary Concert features solos on euphonium and cornet; Making Tracks, by the Desford Colliery Caterpillar Band, features solos on baritone, tuba, flugelhorn, cornet and percussion; The Eastman Wind Ensemble has many fine recordings, and I highly recommend the military band CDs.  One of my favorite band recordings is titled Live in  Osaka: The Eastman Wind Ensemble.
 
FLUTE: Performers to look for: Jean-Pierre Rampal, James Galway (many styles – classical, pop, jazz), Paula Robeson (now living in Boston area!), Laurel Zucker, and Carol Wincenc. Composers and standard repertoire: Handel, Bach, Mozart. Specific recordings of interest: Claude Bollings – Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano (Rampal and Bollings performing); any Galway or Rampal. Jazz performers: Bud Shank, Hubert Laws, Frank Wess (with Count Basie). In more of a pop style, Robert Dick and Jethro Tull.   Fluteist Radio features a variety of professional performers playing on a continuous radio loop: http://www.larrykrantz.com/radio/flute-radio.html
 
 
OBOE: Performers to look for: Heinz Holliger, John De Lancie, John Mack, Harold Gomberg, Ralph Gomberg (Boston area), Marcel Tabateau. Be aware that European performers (other than Holliger) have a school of thought on tone that is very different than ours. Composers and standard repertoire: Mozart (concertos, sonatas, and quartet with strings), Poulenc, Hindemith, Handel (sonatas concertos and concertos for 2 oboes and continuo), Vivaldi, Telemann and Britten. Specific recordings of interest: any Holliger or De Lancie recording; The Art of Oboe Playing (Tabateau) – includes performances and discussion, may be out of print; The Gift (Nancy Rumbel with Eric Tingstad) – a Christmas album with lots of solo oboe and English horn.
 
CLARINET: Performers to look for: Robert Marcellus, Harold Wright, David Schifrin, Richard Stoltzman. Composers and standard repertoire: Mozart Clarinet Concerto, Brahms Trio (clarinet, violin, piano). Specific recordings of interest: Great Performances Mozart Clarinet Concerto (R. Marcellus ); Brahms Trio (Harold Wright); Musica Viva – Clarinet and Piano (Joaquim Valdepemas); Mozart Bassoon Concerto (Sherman Walt) and Mozart Clarinet Concerto (Harold Wright). Larry Combs has recordings out of orchestral excerpts for those really studying the clarinet literature. Stoltzman is an interesting performer; some clarinetists do not like his tone; others think it’s fine. He crosses the style barriers and plays classical, jazz, new-agey.  A couple of possibilities are Begin Sweet World, Brazil, Hark! (Christmas). Jazz Performers: Benny Goodman, Eddie Daniels,
 
SAXOPHONE: Performers to look for: Marcel Mulé, Vincent Abato, Eugene Rousseau, Eugene Bozza, Laura Hunter, Harvey Pittel, Bradford Marsalis. Composers and standard classical repertoire: Ibert Concertino, Glasunow Concerto, Creation of the World by Milhaud (a work for small orchestra with saxophone). Lots of saxophone quartet works are available – sax quartet most often includes soprano, alto, tenor and bari. Specific recordings of interest: Anything by Marcel Mulé! Saxophone Colors (Rousseau); Vincent Abato has a recording out of the Ibert Concertino and the Glasunow Concerto – not sure of title; Saxophonquartette (Berlin Saxophone Quartet) this recording has works by Glasunow, Moulaert, Bumcke and Francaix. The Billy Tipton Memorial Saxophone Quartet is a group of four women who play classical and jazz quartets. Jazz performers: Charlie Parker (Live at Massey Hall); Stan Getz (The Dolphin, Anniversary); Sonny Rollins; Phil Woods; Johnny Hodges (with Duke Ellington); Billy Novick (alto and clarinet – local artist most often seen with Guy VanDuser or Black Eagle Jazz Band); Joshua Redmond (quite an inspirational young player). Myanna (I think she is local) plays a mix of jazz and easy rock style. 29th Street Quartet is a jazz sax quartet. On tenor: John Coltrane & Lester Young, and modern tenor players: Joe Lovano & Michael Brecker. And some student recommended albums: Ben Webster, “Live in Paris”, and Sonny Rollins on “Rollins plays for Bird” or “Don’t stop the Carnival”, Paul Desmond plays with Dave Brubeck on “We’re All Together Again for the First Time” Bari sax: Gerry Mulligan, Harry Carney (with Duke Ellington), Gary Smulyan (with Mel Lewis). And CLASSICAL bari sax: Todd Oxford — Finesse — Equilibrium Records — EQ22 — http://www.equilibri.com
 
BASSOON: Performers to look for: Sherman Walt, Claus Thunemann, John Miller, Christopher Weait, Judith Leclaire, Frank Morelli, Milan Turcovic. Be aware that French performers use different instruments and have a very different school of thought on tone than we do. Composers and standard repertoire: Vivaldi, Mozart, Boismoiter. Specific recordings of interest: Four Centuries of Music for Bassoon (Weait); Mozart Bassoon Concerto (Sherman Walt) and Mozart Clarinet Concerto (Harold Wright).
 
WOODWIND QUINTETS: (flute, oboe, clarinet, french horn and bassoon): Performers to look for: Dorian Woodwind Quintet, Philadelphia Woodwind Quintet, New York Woodwind Quintet. Composers: Ibert, Bozza, Francaix, Poulenc, Milhaud, Danzi.
 
TRUMPET: Classical performers to look for: Maurice Andre, Armando Ghitalla, Wynton Marsalis (crosses styles and is equally good in classical and jazz), Rolf Smedvig (a Bostonian), Steven Burns, Hakan Hardenberger, Timofey Dokschitser (Rhapsody, Concert Pieces, Preludes), Rafael Mandez (Rafael Mandez, vol.1 is really awesome!), Edward Tarr, Doc Sevrinson (has some nice classical recordings as well as the jazz. Composers and Standard Classical Repertoire: Hummel Concerto, Haydn Concerto, Hindemith Sonata, Telemann, Artunian. Specific recordings of interest: All brass quintet recordings are excellent; anything with Ghitalla; Eastman Wind Ensemble – Wynton Marsalis – he plays Aaron Copland’s “Quiet City”; A Portrait of Wynton Marsalis (?exact title) – includes Hummel Concerto and Flight of the Bumblebee; Baroque Miscellaneous Material – Suggested Listening 3 Masterpieces for trumpet and organ (Tarr). Jazz performers: Arturo Sandoval, Dizzie Gillespie, Blue Mitchell, Clifford Brown (With Strings), Chuck Mangione, Maynard Ferguson (Chameleon), Miles Davis (Miles Ahead, Birth of the Cool), and of course Louis Armstrong (although he does non-conventional things with his tone!). Also check out some other greats: Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, Louise Baranger, Nicholas Payton, Roy Hargrove.
 
HORN: Performers to look for: Hermann Baumann, Froydis Ree Werke, Barry Tuckwell, Dennis Brain, Alan Civil, Phil Farkas. Composers and standard repertoire: Mozart concertos, Vivaldi, Telemann, Brahms Trio (horn, violin, piano), Richard Strauss. Specific recordings of interest: All brass quintet recordings are excellent; Horn Club of Los Angeles recordings – works for multiple horns (even 40 or more!); Baumann Mozart Concertos on natural horn (no valves: half-steps achieved by moving the hand in the bell).
 
TROMBONE: Classical performers to look for: Christian Lindberg, Ron Barron (Boston based), John Swallow, Bradnimir Slokar, Doug Yeo (principal bass trombonist of the BSO). Composers and standard classical repertoire: Hindemith, David, Gilmont, Milhaud, Larson, Mozart. Specific recordings of interest: All brass quintet recordings are excellent; Lindberg is THE name in trombone right now and has many recordings out on the Swedish label “Bis”: The Virtuoso Trombone, Stolen Works, Romantic Trombone Concertos, Winter Trombone; Cousins, with John Barrows on trombone and George Swartz on cornet. Four of a Kind: Music for Four Trombones. Jazz performers: Melba Liston (The first professional woman jazz trombone player & a great arranger!), Hal Crook (with Phil Woods), JJ Johnson (Quintergy), Urbie Green (Big Beautiful Band), Slide Hampton (World of Trombones), Frank Rosolino (Conversation), Bill Watrous.
 
BARITONE/EUPHONIUM: Performers to look for: Brian Bowman, Robert Childs, Nicholas Childs, Roger Behrend, Jean-Pierre Chevallier. Specific recordings of interest: Child’s Play and Euphonium Music (both by the Childs brothers) on Summit Records (not always in stores) -Box 26850, Tempi. AZ 85282; Elegance-Barat (Behrend).
 
TUBA: Performers to look for: Sam Pilafian, Roger Bobo, Dan Perantoni, Gene Pokorny, Jim Self. Composers and standard repertoire: Vaughn-Williams Concerto and show-off pieces like “Flight of the Bumblebee.” Specific recordings of interest: All brass quintet recordings are excellent (the Boston Brass Quintet has a wonderful tuba player!); Travelin’ Light (Pilafian) – kind of jazzy; Tuba Tracks (Pokorny); Changing Colors (Self). The last two are on Summit Records (not always available in stores) – Box 26850, Tempi, AZ 85282.
 
BRASS QUINTET: (two trumpets, horn, trombone and tuba): Performers to look for: Boston Brass Quintet; Canadian Brass Quintet (the consummate performers: serious and humorous with a mix of styles, they are entertainers and incredible musicians!); Empire Brass; Philadelphia Brass Quintet; Phillip Jones Brass Ensemble. Specific recordings of interest: Canadian: High Bright and Clear (baroque era), Basin Street (jazz), Canadian Brass Christmas, Champions (a mix), and a number of videos of concerts.  A Cool Brassy Night at the North Pole (French Horn, Tuba, and trumpet – Thomas Bacon, David Hickman, Sam Pilafian).
 
PERCUSSION: Specific recordings of interest: Bach on Wood and Bach Beat (Brian Slawson) – CBS Records – percussion ensemble arrangements of classic pieces; The All Star Percussion Ensemble (Harold Farberman) – MMG recordings; “Nexus” (percussion ensemble) recordings; John Williams and Friends (two guitars, string bass and marimbas); Arthur Press has an old recording of orchestral excerpts and how to perform them; recordings by Dave Samuels of “Spiro Gira”. Jazz Drumset performers: Max Roach, Buddy Rich, Louie Belson (has a great video out also), Art Blakey, Elvin Jones, Mel Lewis (Thad Jones/Mel Sewis Orchestra), Dave Weckle (sp? – with Chick Corea), Peter Erskine, Cindy Blackman (also composer). Vibraphone: Gary Burton & Lionel Hampton. Marimba: Keiko Abe (plays w/3 mallets in each hand!); Evelyn Glynnie (percussionist who is deaf!)
 
JAZZ: We play Big Band arrangements; mostly swing style, so I am going to focus on the big band era. Soloists for specific instruments are included above. Big Band Groups to look for: Count Basie, Lionel Hampton, Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, Paul Whiteman, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Woody Herman.
     Jazz bass performers: Ray Brown, Charlie Mingus, Milt Hinton, Jaco Pastorius, Ron Carter, Christian McBride.     
     Charles Mingus, “Changes”, Rufus Reid with Stan Getz on “Serenity” or “Anniversary”, and Paul Chambers with Miles
     Davis on “Steamin’ with Miles Davis” are some student suggested album.
     Jazz guitar performers: Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Larry Coryell, Jim Hall, Joe Pass, Jane Miller, John   
     Scofield, Bill Frisell, Pat Metheny.
     Jazz piano performers: Oscar Peterson, Kenny Barron, Mary Lou Williams, Art Tatum, Bud Powell, Bill Evans,   
     Duke Ellington, Marian McPartland, McCoy Tyner, Jim McNeely (with Phil Woods & Stan Getz), Lyle Mays (with Pat
     Metheny), Chick Corea, Toshiko Akiyoshi.
     Jazz vocalists: Ella Fitzgerald, Mel Tormé, Cleo Laine, Joe Williams, Manhattan Transfer, Singers Unlimited and a
     fairly new to the scene – Diana Kroll.
 
Other big bands of note: Thad Jones/Mel Lewis, GRP all-star big band, Bill Holman, Toshiko Akioshi, Maria Schneider Jazz Orchestra (she is an amazing composer!) — and– DIVA is a big band made up of all women musicians. (Even today, they still get comments like, “You play well for girls!” Sigh…)
 
 
 
 
Listed below are compositions in which the following instruments are prominently featured:
 
Flute
Tchaikovsky – Nutcracker Suite, Dance of the Mirlitons (Dance of the Toy Flutes)
Grieg – Peer Gynt Suite, No. 1, Morning Mood
Sousa – The Stars and Stripes Forever
Jethro Tull – Bourree
Grainger – Country Gardens
The Caribbean Jazz Project – Rendezvous
Cal Tjader – Manila
Bizet – Carmen Suite #1, Intermezzo
Bizet – L’Arlesiene Suite #1, Farandole
Kodaly –Hary Janos Suite, II. Viennese Musical Clock
Ippolitov-Ivanov – Caucasian Sketches, Procession of the Sardar
Prokofiev – Lieutenant Kije Suite – I. Kije’s Birth
Jerry Goldsmith – Main theme from “Rudy”
Ungar – Ashokan Farewell (played by James Galway)
Mancini – The Pink Panther (played by James Galway)
Bach – Badinerie (played by James Galway)
 
Oboe
Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake, Dance of the Swans
Dvorak – Serenade Op. 44, IV. Finale (Allegro Molto)
Dvorak – Symphony #9, II. Largo
Dvorak – Slavonic Dances, Op. 46 #4 in F
William Schuman – Chester (NorthernIllinoisUniversity)
Prokofiev – Love for Three Organes, March
Mussorgsky – Pictures at an Exhibition, Tuileries (not the piano version)
Copland – Appalachian Spring, Doppio Movimento
Mozart – Gran Partita, Finale (Molto Allegro)
Mozart – Oboe Concerto in C
Bartok – Concerto for Orchestra, II. Giuocco Delle Coppie
 
Bassoon
Bizet – Carmen Suite #1, Aragoniase
Clarinet polka (performed by Polkastra)
Dukas- The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Dvorak – Serenade Op. 44, IV. Finale (Allegro Molto)
Stravinsky- The Rite of Spring, Part 1: The Adoration of the Earth
Mussorgsky – Pictures at an Exhibition, The Old Castle (not the piano version)
Bartok – Concerto for Orchestra, II. Giuocco Delle Coppie
Mozart – Bassoon Concerto in B-flat
Mozart – Gran Partita, Finale (Molto Allegro)
Ippolitov-Ivanov – Caucasian Sketches, Procession of the Sardar
Copland – Appalachian Spring, Doppio Movimento
 
Clarinet
Grainger – Molly on the Shore (Dallas Wind Symphony)
Mozart – Gran Partita, Finale (Molto Allegro)
Halvorsen – Entry March of the Boyars
Artie Shaw – Concerto for Clarinet
Bernstein – On the Town, III. Times Square, 1944
Dvorak – Serenade Op. 44, IV. Finale (Allegro Molto)
Clarinet Polka
Gershwin – Rhapsody in Blue
Rimsky-Korsakov – Capriccio Espagnol – 1. Alborada
Holst – 1st Suite, III. March
Grainger – The Gum Suckers March
Tchaikovsky – The Nutcracker Suite, Arabian Dance
Mozart – Clarinet Concerto in A
Paul Harvey – Quartet, Scherzo
 
Saxophone
Mussorgsky – Pictures at an Exhibition, The Old Castle (not the piano version)
Holst – 2nd Suite, IV. Fantasia on the Dargason
Branford Marsalis – Mo’ Better Blues
Count Basie – Things ain’t the way they use to be
The CaribbeanJazz Project – Rendezvous
Towerof Power– Squib Cakes (especiallyBari. Sax)
Bernstein – On the Town, III. Times Square, 1944
The Mighty Mighty Bosstones – The Impression That I Get (there are clean and explicit versions of this song)
Chicago– 25 or 6 to 4
Richie Valens – Tequila
 
Trumpet
Aaron Copland- Fanfare for the Common Man
Rimsky-Korsakov – Procession of the Nobles
Shostakovich – Festive Overture
Sibelius – Finlandia
Stravinsky – Petrushka, Dance of the Ballerina
Branford Marsalis – Mo’ Better Blues
Mussorgsky / Ravel– Pictures at an Exhibition, Promenade 1 (not the piano version)
Mussorgsky / Ravel – Pictures at the Exhibition, The Great Gate of Kiev (not the piano version)
CliftonWilliams – Dramatic Essay
Leroy Anderson – Trumpeter’s Lullaby
Lerory Anderson – Bugler’s Holiday
Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake, Neopolitan Dance
Stravinsky – The Firebird Suite, Infernal Dance
Towerof Power– Squib Cakes
John Williams – Superman: Theme
John Williams – Star Wars: Main Title
John Williams – Star Wars: Imperial March
John Williams – Raider’s March
John Williams – Star Wars: The Throne Room
Strauss – Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001 Space Odyssey Theme)
Von Suppe – Light Cavalry Overture
James Horner – Apollo 13
Chicago– 25 or 6 to 4
Prokofiev – Scythian Suite, The Enemy God and the Dance of the Spirits of Darkness
Wagner – Ride of the Valkyries
Stevie Wonder – Superstition
Stevie Wonder – I wish
Dvorak – Symphony #9, IV. Finale
 
French Horn
Aaron Copland – Fanfare for the Common Man
Shostakovich – Festive Overture
Rimsky-Korsakov – Procession of the Nobles
Sibelius – Finlandia
Wilcox Jenkins – American Overture for Band
Stravinsky – The Firebird Suite, Finale
John Williams – Superman: Theme
John Williams – Star Wars: Main Title
John Williams – Star Wars: Imperial March
John Williams – Raider’s March
John Williams – Star Wars: The Throne Room
Strauss – Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001 Space Odyssey Theme)
Von Suppe – Light Cavalry Overture
James Horner – The Mask of Zorro (from the Album “Film Music by James Horner)
Prokofiev – Scythian Suite, The Enemy God and the Dance of the Spirits of Darkness
Wagner – Ride of the Valkyries
Dvorak – Symphony #9, IV. Finale
 
Trombone
Aaron Copland – Fanfare for the Common Man
Shostakovich – Festive Overture
Rimsky-Korsakov – Procession of the Nobles
Sibelius – Finlandia
Stravinsky – The Firebird Suite, Infernal Dance
Towerof Power– Squib Cakes
John Williams – Superman: Theme
John Williams – Star Wars: Main Title
John Williams – Star Wars: Imperial March
John Williams – Raider’s March
John Williams – Star Wars: The Throne Room
Strauss – Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001 Space Odyssey Theme)
The Specials – Guns of Navarone (this band has some songs with mildly explicit lyrics, although this particular song is clean b/c there are no words)
Chicago– 25 or 6 to 4
Prokofiev – Scythian Suite, The Enemy God and the Dance of the Spirits of Darkness
Wagner – Ride of the Valkyries
 
Tuba/Baritone/Euphonium
Holst – 2ndSuite1. March
Aaron Copland – Fanfare for the Common Man
Shostakovich – Festive Overture
Rimsky-Korsakov – Procession of the Nobles
Sibelius – Finlandia
Holst – 2nd Suite 1. March
Stravinsky – The Firebird Suite, Infernal Dance
John Williams – Superman: Theme
John Williams – Star Wars: Main Title
John Williams – Star Wars: Imperial March
John Williams – Raider’s March
John Williams – Star Wars: The Throne Room
Strauss – Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001 Space Odyssey Theme)
Prokofiev – Scythian Suite, The Enemy God and the Dance of the Spirits of Darkness
Wagner – Ride of the Valkyries
 
Percussion
Philip Glass: Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpanists and Orchestra
Shostakovich: Symphony #10, II. Allegro
Rimsky-Korsakov – Procession of the Nobles
Miles Davis / Milt Jackson – Bags’ Groove
The CaribbeanJazz Project – Rendezvous
Dave Brubeck – Take Five
Rush – YYZ (from “Exit…Stage Left” album)
Rush – The Rhythm Method
Rimsky-Korsakov – Capriccio Espagnol – 1. Alborada
Tito Puente – Chang
Tito Puente – Oye Como Va
Santana – She’s Not There
Gliere – Russian Sailor’s Dance
 
 
 
 
Have some suggested listening of your own? Submit your suggestions to bsmith@sau40.com, and possibly earn some extra credit! Sorry, suggestions of musicians in the style of Pop, Rap, Alternative, Rock, Country, etc. will not be accepted.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                                                            Copyright D. Muffit –WaylandMiddle School                
 
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